Kitchen Sink Realism Films & British New Wave Cinema – Useful Reading

Room At The Top
Room At The Top
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Kitchen Sink Realism Films – A Selection Of Links To Articles & Further Reading

Below are a collection of links to ideal reading for those interested in Kitchen Sink Realism films.
This is regardless of whether you are a novice or an avid collector and viewer of these films. These articles offer a great insight into “British New Wave” cinema.

Where to begin with kitchen sink drama

A great introductory article for those interested in Kitchen Sink Realism films, but have yet to watch. The BFI article also recommends their preferred selection of the films that first time viewers may wish to watch first.

Room At The Top Opening Credits

Ian Hendry (2013)

Oh Do Shut Up! 10 Classic British Kitchen Sink Dramas




I do like this article. It offers a concise synopsis of the some of the more popular British new wave films. Mentioned are the popular Kitchen Sinkdramas from the 1950s. These being Look Back In Anger, A Taste Of Honey and Room At The Top. In addition Allan Sillitoe’s novel to film adaptations of Saturday Night And Sunday Morning and The Loneliness Of The Long Distance Runner. Progressing into the 1960s it discusses the story outlines of the L-Shaped Room, Up the Junction, Poor Cow and Cathy Come Home. However refreshingly included is Ladybird Ladybird directed by Ken Loach in 1994. A film which I rarely see discussed in general articles relating to the Kitchen Sink genre of films.

Saturday Night And Sunday Morning Trailer

Kuman Cosmo (2010)

British New Wave – Phil Wickham




A concise and quick introduction of what “British New Wave” cinema is about. This page also consists of links to individual pages of the main Kitchen Sink films of the 1950s and the 1960s.

Everything you need to know about Kitchen Sink Dramas – Eleanor Dunn

Discusses Room At The Top, The L Shaped Room and Up The Junction. However unlike the other articles above it includes the Stan Barstow adaptation of A Kind Of Loving as well as Bill Naughton’s Spring and Port Wine.

When kitchen-sink drama revolutionised British cinema – Vintage Classics

A brief introduction to the understanding of what these stories try to convey to the viewer. As well as discussing A Kind of Loving, Billy Liar and Poor Cow.

Billy Liar Official Trailer

 palacecinemas (2014)

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